Monday, September 25, 2023
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Jun 12, 2022

Miko Marczyk won his home rally Poland 2022

Miko Marczyk claimed his first-ever FIA European Rally Championship (ERC) victory despite a lat ...
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Jun 11, 2022

Nil Solans crashes in Rally Poland, Miko Marczyk is one step away from victory

Miko Marczyk is on course for victory on home soil at Orlen 78th Rally Poland after rival Nil S ...
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Jun 10, 2022

Nil Solans fastest in qualifying stage of Rally Poland 2022

Nil Solans’ bid for a hat-trick of ERC victories is off to a strong start as the Spaniard went ...
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Sep 18, 2021

Andreas Mikkelsen / E. Edmondson won the Azores Rally 2021

The Norwegian crew was the first to reach the final of the 13-stage rally with a time of 2:32:31.5.
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Sep 04, 2022

The Formula 1 drivers staged a race in reverse

An unusual competition took place in the Netherlands.
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Aug 18, 2022

The most difficult rally in history - no one reached the finish line

The Dead and the Alive: The story of a rally in which no one made it to the ...
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Aug 12, 2021

A terrible accident on a straight road with good visibility and bad drivers.

A terrible accident on a straight road with good visibility and bad drivers.
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Jan 22, 2023

Ogier and Toyota bid for 2023 title after strong Rallye Monte-Carlo

Already after the first race of the World Rally Championship, the Monte-Carlo Rally, we can say that the 2023 season will be Toyota's season.
 0    321Read more..  
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Oct 02, 2022

Kalle Rovanperä wins Rally New Zealand and the 2022 World Championship

An incredible ride to the very end for the crew Rovanperä K.
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WRC Details - Coming Soon

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Your modern car is the place where you are under complete surveillance and absolutely everything is known about you.

Your modern car is the place where you are under complete surveillance and absolutely everything is known about you. Multiple cameras and microphones make privacy in your car impossible.

Car makers have been bragging about their cars being “computers on wheels" for years to promote their advanced features. However, the conversation about what driving a computer means for its occupants' privacy hasn’t really caught up. While we worried that our doorbells and watches that connect to the internet might be spying on us, car brands quietly entered the data business by turning their vehicles into powerful data-gobbling machines. Machines that, because of all those brag-worthy bells and whistles, have an unmatched power to watch, listen, and collect information about what you do and where you go in your car.

All 25 car brands we researched earned our *Privacy Not Included warning label -- making cars the official worst category of products for privacy that we have ever reviewed.

The car brands we researched are terrible at privacy and security
Why are cars we researched so bad at privacy? And how did they fall so far below our standards? Let us count the ways!

1. They collect too much personal data (all of them)
We reviewed 25 car brands in our research and we handed out 25 “dings” for how those companies collect and use data and personal information. That’s right: every car brand we looked at collects more personal data than necessary and uses that information for a reason other than to operate your vehicle and manage their relationship with you. For context, 63% of the mental health apps (another product category that stinks at privacy) we reviewed this year received this “ding.”

And car companies have so many more data-collecting opportunities than other products and apps we use -- more than even smart devices in our homes or the cell phones we take wherever we go. They can collect personal information from how you interact with your car, the connected services you use in your car, the car’s app (which provides a gateway to information on your phone), and can gather even more information about you from third party sources like Sirius XM or Google Maps. It’s a mess. The ways that car companies collect and share your data are so vast and complicated that we wrote an entire piece on how that works. The gist is: they can collect super intimate information about you -- from your medical information, your genetic information, to your “sex life” (seriously), to how fast you drive, where you drive, and what songs you play in your car -- in huge quantities. They then use it to invent more data about you through “inferences” about things like your intelligence, abilities, and interests.

2. Most (84%) share or sell your data
It’s bad enough for the behemoth corporations that own the car brands to have all that personal information in their possession, to use for their own research, marketing, or the ultra-vague “business purposes.” But then, most (84%) of the car brands we researched say they can share your personal data -- with service providers, data brokers, and other businesses we know little or nothing about. Worse, nineteen (76%) say they can sell your personal data.

A surprising number (56%) also say they can share your information with the government or law enforcement in response to a “request.” Not a high bar court order, but something as easy as an “informal request.” Yikes -- that’s a very low bar! A 2023 rewrite of Thelma & Louise would have the ladies in custody before you’ve had a chance to make a dent in your popcorn. But seriously, car companies' willingness to share your data is beyond creepy. It has the potential to cause real harm and inspired our worst cars-and-privacy nightmares.

And keep in mind that we only know what companies do with personal data because of the privacy laws that make it illegal not to disclose that information (go California Consumer Privacy Act!). So-called anonymized and aggregated data can (and probably is) shared too, with vehicle data hubs (the data brokers of the auto industry) and others. So while you are getting from A to B, you’re also funding your car’s thriving side-hustle in the data business in more ways than one.

3. Most (92%) give drivers little to no control over their personal data
All but two of the 25 car brands we reviewed earned our “ding” for data control, meaning only two car brands, Renault and Dacia (which are owned by the same parent company) say that all drivers have the right to have their personal data deleted. We would like to think this deviation is one car company taking a stand for drivers’ privacy. It’s probably no coincidence though that these cars are only available in Europe -- which is protected by the robust General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) privacy law. In other words: car brands often do whatever they can legally get away with to your personal data.

4. We couldn’t confirm whether any of them meet our Minimum Security Standards
It’s so strange to us that dating apps and sex toys publish more detailed security information than cars. Even though the car brands we researched each had several long-winded privacy policies (Toyota wins with 12), we couldn’t find confirmation that any of the brands meet our Minimum Security Standards.

Our main concern is that we can’t tell whether any of the cars encrypt all of the personal information that sits on the car. And that’s the bare minimum! We don’t call them our state-of-the-art security standards, after all. We reached out (as we always do) by email to ask for clarity but most of the car companies completely ignored us. Those who at least responded (Mercedes-Benz, Honda, and technically Ford) still didn’t completely answer our basic security questions.

A failure to properly address cybersecurity might explain their frankly embarrassing security and privacy track records. We only looked at the last three years, but still found plenty to go on with 17 (68%) of the car brands earning the “bad track record” ding for leaks, hacks, and breaches that threatened their drivers’ privacy.

Some not-so-fun facts about these rankings:
- Tesla is only the second product we have ever reviewed to receive all of our privacy “dings.” (The first was an AI chatbot we reviewed earlier this year.) What set them apart was earning the “untrustworthy AI” ding. The brand’s AI-powered autopilot was reportedly involved in 17 deaths and 736 crashes and is currently the subject of multiple government investigations.
- Nissan earned its second-to-last spot for collecting some of the creepiest categories of data we have ever seen. It’s worth reading the review in full, but you should know it includes your “sexual activity.” Not to be out done, Kia also mentions they can collect information about your “sex life” in their privacy policy. Oh, and six car companies say they can collect your “genetic information” or “genetic characteristics.” Yes, reading car privacy policies is a scary endeavor.
- None of the car brands use language that meets Mozilla’s privacy standard about sharing information with the government or law enforcement, but Hyundai goes above and beyond. In their privacy policy, it says they will comply with “lawful requests, whether formal or informal.” That’s a serious red flag.
- All of the car brands on this list except for Tesla, Renault, and Dacia signed on to a list of Consumer Protection Principles from the US automotive industry group ALLIANCE FOR AUTOMOTIVE INNOVATION, INC. The list includes great privacy-preserving principles such as “data minimization,” “transparency,” and “choice.” But the number of car brands that follow these principles? Zero. It’s interesting if only because it means the car companies do clearly know what they should be doing to respect your privacy even though they absolutely don’t do it.

By Jen Caltrider, Misha Rykov and Zoë MacDonald


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A fire in a brand new electric car has led to a major fire on a ship carrying cars.

A fire in a brand new electric car has led to a major fire on a ship carrying cars.
According to preliminary data, the fire was started by an electric car. Fire cannot be extinguished yet.
It is clear from the report that the extinguishing is currently being done by other vessels with water. However, water does not help extinguish electric cars, it only exacerbates the problem.

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The ship is currently burning off the coast of the Netherlands, and the ship is carrying 3,000 cars. It is not clear how many of them are electric cars.
Unfortunately, one person died on the ship as a result of the fire and 16 were injured.
It is not clear how many people the ship's crew consists of, but such transport vessels have a small crew, and in all likelihood the majority of the crew is from the casualties.

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Another eerie accident with an electric car.

Another eerie accident with an electric car. When charging an electric car with current, an explosion occurs (another one). A person from the staff of the charging station was seriously injured in the explosion of the battery.
The mass imposition of these still dangerous and environmentally harmful cars leads to fires, explosions, radiation for the passengers and the driver, and major ecological disasters with the mining of lithiums, as well as the non-recyclability of the batteries.

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